Episode No. 05

What It's Like To Be A "Brown Girl" with Digital Video Producer, Yessica Cruz 

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Seattle born digital video creator now living in the very hot city of Los Angeles. She worked up the ranks of BuzzFeed Motion Pictures, producing over 22 digital videos & appearing in more than 137 videos, was a founding producer and personality behind Buzzfeed’s Latinx Facebook page, Pero Like. Yessica hosted and produced an 11 episode series on Flama called Mas Mexican focusing on understanding different aspects of Mexican identity by meeting people in the street. Yessica currently produces shows with People Be Like, focusing on entertaining yet informative content aimed at a diverse millennial audience. 

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

 

“I’m going to use my voice to advocate for people” - Yessica Cruz

In this episode, we sit down with Digital Video Producer, Yessica Cruz, to chat about how she strives to celebrate difference in latin culture. In this interview, Yessica talks about moving from Seattle, latinx, and societal inequality.

“Coming from an intersectional, multi-culture background in Seattle, I identify with the others. I know, that it is a terrible thing to grow up with, feeling like you can’t trust your government. That’s also very dangerous, to have citizens afraid of the government. That’s no way to have a democracy.”

Yessica goes on to talk about how the feeling of oppression has weighed on her since she was three years old and that  lead her to speak out to her audience that is a younger generation.

“I’m going to use my voice to advocate for people. I want to evoke change and I think younger kids and people are my age are the ones to evoke change.

Yvette and Audrey talk about their fears as America transitions with the new president and their feeling of “otherness” which have resurfaced.

"By unlearning a lot of things that society taught me, I became woke" - Yessica Cruz

This and previous episodes of Brown Girls Rising, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & SoundCloud.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 04

What It's Like To Be A "Brown Girl" with Writer + Producer Betsy Aimee Cardenas 

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Betsy Aimee Cardenas is a writer and producer of impactful digital content on a mission to transform hearts and minds. She is the co-host of Women Who Misbehave, a podcast about the intersections of the political, personal, pop-culture, and spiritual. She writes about issues that affect millennials, her work has been featured in Marie Claire, Forbes Woman, Vox, and others. 

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

 

We’re going to see we’re the ones we’ve been waiting for" - Betsy Aimee Cardenas

In this episode, we chat with Writer and Producer, Betsy Aimee Cardenas knowing your roots. In this interview, Betsy talks about being a first generation child and what it’s like to raise her son as a feminist.  

“I believe in equality among the sexes. It’s about having choice filled lives. We teach our daughter that they can be strong, but we teach our sons they have to be strong. We can’t want equality and then have fantasies of men rescuing us.”

Betsy goes on to talk about how she’s never shied away from the F word and who her biggest inspirations are.

“Gloria Stienem is one of my role models. One of the things I realized growing up is that a lot of my feminism focused on white-middle class. There are so many other heroes, Sonia Sotormeyor. I love her, she’s an amazing role model. She’s what an outspoken Latina looks like. Cherri Moraga is an amazing chicana writer.... ”

Audrey and Yvette compare stories of their first experience with “otherness” and growing up feeling like “too much or not enough” in both worlds.

"Your mental sanity is worth making changes in your life” - Betsy Aimee Cardenas

This and previous episodes of Brown Girls Rising, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & SoundCloud

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 03

Speaking on Spanglish and Stepping Into Your Power with Radio + TV Personality RaqC

 

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Raquel Cordova, better known as RaqC, coined “The Queen of Spanglish Media” and uses her blogging platform on Latina Magazine’s celebrity blog to share tips on what it means to be a “modern day Latina”. RaqC credits her free spirit as the inspiration to seize every opportunity that presents itself. She views radio as an outlet to express her love, happiness, and ambitions with the masses.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Español to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

“Don’t ever be afraid of anyone telling you, ‘You’re thinking too big!’” - RaqC

In this episode, we sit down with Radio and TV personality, RaqC,  to talk about how she stumbled into her own and made a career of it. This interview is filled with stories of how stepping out of her comfort zone, SnapChat, and just being herself led RaqC to where she is today.

“When people don’t take you serious, your mentality starts to change. You start asking, “Is this ever going to change?” At the end of the day, I realize that I bring value to whatever I do. You have to train your mind that and I practice what I preach. I had to tell myself I am worthy”

RaqC also opens about how she didn’t realize she was a feminist right away and how she had to make it her own.

“Throughout my career 90% of my bosses have been men, and the women were secretaries or assistant VPs and I’m like why? I just want women to step in their greatness and own their independence.”

Audrey and Yvette gab about their individual views of feminism including how they found themselves and their true callings right around turning 30.

“You’re always going to be too much or not enough for somebody” - Audrey Bellis

This and previous episodes of Brown Girls Rising, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & Soundcloud.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

 

Episode No. 02

Talking About Art and Activism with Illustrator + Art Curator, Maritza Lugo

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Martiza is currently a freelance illustrator and art curator. She recently launched her first art show, Women of Color Only. Often referred to as the Pop Culture Queen she can be found transforming Disney Princesses to be "Just Like Us" through illustration. Featured: Buzzfeed, Latina, Refinery29, teenVogue, Glamour, PopSugar, Forbes, and many more. 

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"The passion for your career should be louder than the doubt" - Martiza Lugo

In this episode, we sit down with Illustrator and Art Curator, Maritza Lugo, to discuss her call to feminist action. In this interview, Maritza candidly opens up about hosting her first art show, which featured Women of Color Only and was the first of it’s kind in Los Angeles.

“In all of the art shows I had been as an illustrator, I’ve never fully seen women of color. It’s always primarily white male and sometimes, female. So I thought how is this the first one in Los Angeles?”

Maritza also talks about how she was a right-of-the-womb feminist, but how her feminism has changed and evolved throughout the years.

“You could say my feminism has changed, now I only want to speak about feminism when it  includes women of color. I've always been a "brown girl" not just my makeup genetically but in my personality"

Yvette and Audrey talk about dodging the online haters, their mothers’ view of feminism versus their own, and why they think feminism sits on a spectrum.

"Women have been fighting for rights since the ‘20s but, if you don’t include marginalized voices then we’re all losing." - Martiza Lugo


This and previous episodes of Brown Girls Rising, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & Soundcloud.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 01

What It Means To Be A "Brown Girl" with NYLON en Español Editor In Chief, Marty Preciado

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Marty is currently serving as Editor In Cheif for NYLON Español Media. Research and writing focuses on transcultural exchange of politics and gender, with an emphasis on music, arts and culture. Additionally, has lead editorial teams and launched team projects in Madrid, Washington D.C, Mexico City and currently in Los Angeles. Published: VICE, NYLON Español, Remezcla, Rookie, Noisey. Featured: NPR, NBC, Univisión. 

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture. In our inaugural episode, we sit down with Editor In Chief of Nylon En Espanol, Marty Preciado to explore her feminist experiences.

"We’re in a society where we’re constantly looking up to role models without thinking you can also be one." - Marty Preciado

In this interview she recalls racial injustices during the ICE Raids in the 90s. We also chat about how blue hair and The Spice girls ignited the feminist within her:

"I grew up listening to punk music and first arose to girl power, thanks to the Spice Girls, without knowing that the Spice Girls was a movement created by a white group here in the United States. So while I was listening to punk music and had blue hair, I felt rebellious until I understood that where I was hanging out was void of women. No women, period."

Marty also talks about how intersectional feminism and her personal role models lead her to work at Nylon Espanol today:

"I went to school for law and political science, that was my goal., until I realized that I was could  make a change through culture and not just through the law. I wanted to make a change through the everyday incidents, through life, through music, through literature, through entertainment and try to find the representation of people of our community into the spaces that are needed."

Audrey and Yvette candidly chat about coming into their own forms of feminism,  the stigma attached with that particular F-word, how they’re always adjusting and relearning the definition of it.  

“If one person isn't free, none of us are free." - Yvette Montoya

This episode, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & Soundcloud.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.