Episode No. 18

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Eileen Rosete is a marriage and family therapist (MSMFT), yoga instructor, and mama. She added the role of entrepreneur to her list when she launched Our Sacred Women in 2016 - a social enterprise dedicated to offering specialty gifts that help women feel seen, valued, and honored. She is passionate about helping people connect meaningfully with themselves and others, and in doing so, cultivate healing moments of witnessing and being witnessed.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"You'll recognize that helping others, helps you." - Eileen Rosete

 In this episode, we chat with Founder of Our Sacred Women, Eileen Rosete about the importance of what we are bringing to the world. Eileen talks about how sometimes you find solace in helping others.

“The things that we are trying to offer the world, are often times things we’re working on in our lives. You’re not just helping others but you'll recognize that helping others, helps you.”

 Also, Eileen talks about what inspired her to start a business that empowers women but, also reflects the values of the culture she was raised in.

“I wanted to be more of a bridge builder. Women are sacred, to me, is hopefully a platform where people of all walks of life can get on board with.”

 Audrey talks about how yoga helped her in a time of need and how she started Worthy Women from a place of healing.

"Someone’s healing is waiting on your revealing." - Audrey Bellis

 This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 18, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

 This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 17

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Joy Riley, as the Founder of Love Jays + Married Millennials Podcast, loves love. Although she is passionate about relationships, she is most interested in the relationship we all share with ourselves. When she's not asking any and everybody what makes their soul tick, this former dancer can often be found on her sofa reading a good book with her feet propped up on her husband's lap, while snuggling with their two dogs.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"If you don’t recognize your value, no one else is going to see it. And if you do recognize you’re less likely to allow someone in your life who doesn’t." - Joy Riley

In this episode, we chat with Married Millennials Podcast Host, Joy Riley about the importance of relationships. Joy talks about how the relationship you have with yourself is most important and a foundation for what you accept in other relationships.

 “If you feel like to be in a relationship you can be the best version of yourself or the best you - you shouldn’t be in that relationship! You don’t need to live for somebody, with somebody, just alongside somebody”

 Joy also sheds light on her experience with white guilt and her feelings on diversity.

 “Diversity shouldn’t be the issue [anymore]. We don’t all have to be the same. We just need to bring it to the table, address it, and move on. Not harp on it.”

 Audrey talks about how she believes the relationship you have with other people is the direct result of the relationship you have with yourself and why it’s so important to remedy that relationship first.

"Sometimes you are the victim of society, but you cannot let that define you. " - Joy Riley

 This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 17, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

 This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 16

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Renata Simril is President and CEO of the LA84 Foundation (www.LA84.org). Formed in 1985, originally as the Amateur Athletic Foundation, the LA84 Foundation is a legacy of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Summer Games. Ms. Simril began her career in the U.S. Army as a Military. Ms. Simril is an accomplished civic and private sector trailblazer with more than 25 years of diversified experience with a commitment to leadership and service.  She most recently served as Senior Vice President and Chief of Staff to the Publisher of the Los Angeles Times, where she oversaw staff operations and special projects.  Her earlier career included three seasons with the Los Angeles Dodgers, where she served as Senior Vice President of External Affairs overseeing the restoration of the Dodgers brand and the Dodgers Foundation; and over a decade in real estate development with Jones Lang LaSalle, Forest City Development and LCOR, Inc. 

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"Service is the price you pay for the space you occupy " - Renata Simril

 In this episode, we chat with LA84’s President, Renata Simril about how she got her start and has climbed the ladder ever since. She begins talking about how in order to get her start, she had to fight for education and opportunities.

 “Education is universal, opportunity is not. Opportunities lead me to phenomenal mentors along the way, people that really believed in me and believed in my success. ”  

 Renata also talks about her relationship with the word feminist and how that contributes to her business lifestyle now.

“I am about women and creating opportunities for women to do whatever they want to do. If you want to call that feminism, great.”

 Audrey talks about how she was the ultimate finesser when it came to dodging P.E. class and how in hindsight she believes that shaped her to be who she is today.

"The stories that keep me inspired, are one kid at a time, one family at a time." - Renata Simril

 This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 16, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

 This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 15

Feminism and Festivals with Do LaB's Monica Fernandez

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As Executive Producer and a foundational member of the Do LaB community, Monica Fernandez oversees Lightning In A Bottle's production, while curating a host of the event's creative programming and media. Proud to be a woman in a male dominated industry, she employs an empathetic management style known as “compassionate leadership”, which is instrumental in understanding how individuals think, feel and get motivated.  She sees this as an invaluable tool in retaining and grooming talent so that each of her team members have the opportunity to reach their highest potential both in the office and at home.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"We are always looking at ways to curate and create more diversity in our community." - Monica Fernandez

In this episode, we chat with Do LaB’s Executive Producer, Monica Fernandez about how she made a way for herself in a male dominated workplace. She also, goes on to talk about how they advice she gave herself back then probably wouldn’t be the advice she’d give young girls today.

“I felt like pulling back my femininity, I started wearing more black and I always wore heels so I can be tall. It helped me be heard but, now looking back I don’t know how I feel about that anymore...”

Monica also details one of her experiences with racism and otherness, she goes on to say how that has changed how she shows up in the workplace today.

“I want to create an even playing for everybody. Whether it’s an actual playing field or the workplace. I want people to look at people as just people.”

Audrey and Yvette talk about their experiences with raves (or lack thereof), how they deal with feminism in the workplace, and growing up with otherness.

"I want people to look at people as just people" - Monica Fernandez

This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 15, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 14

Sports, Entertainment, and Owning Your Stuff with Jaia Thomas

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Jaia Thomas is a sports and entertainment attorney. She obtained her Bachelor of Arts degree from Colgate University and her Juris Doctor from The George Washington University Law School. She primarily assists clients with transactional and intellectual property matters. In addition to her legal experience, she is an adjunct professor at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Prior to her appointment at UCLA, Jaia taught and guest lectured at American University, Georgetown University, Vassar College and Carnegie Mellon University. Jaia has been cited as a legal expert in such publications as The New York Times and USA Today and has had several scholarly works published in the American Bar Association, National Bar Association and various journals. A native of Cincinnati, Ohio, Jaia volunteers for several organizations such as the California African American Museum and is the founder of a free legal clinic in her hometown.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture

"I've always felt like women should receive equal treatment as men" - Jaia Thomas

In this episode, we chat with Sports + Entertainment lawyer, Jaia Thomas about talks about her surprising lack of having to deal with discrimination. She also, goes on to talk about how she encourages other young women to follow in her footsteps to change the lack of diversity in the academia world.

 “I grew up being taught the importance of self sustainability and owning your stuff”

 Jaia also discusses her relationship with feminism. She talks about how her definition of feminism differs from the “white” feminism and why that is.

 “Yes, I feel like women should receive equal treatment as men. However, my definition and the things I find important in feminism might be different than that of the white woman. Just because we have different needs.”

 Audrey and Yvette talk about how Brown Girls Rising was made for the women who couldn’t identify with White Feminism or Black Girl magic and why that’s important to them.

"Who is not worthy of a redemption story?" - Audrey Bellis

 This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 11, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

 This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 13

Changing The World One Cupcake at a Time with Karina Jimenez

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After baking cupcakes as an escape to a dull desk job, Karina Jimenez decided to turn her attention to a more creatively fulfilling side business. She searched within, turning to her own knowledge and found what she had in her all along, a love for her Mexican culture and the food she had grown up with. As a self-professed sweet tooth and foodie, it only made sense to Karina to fuse dessert with culture, and thus Viva Los Cupcakes was born.  Since its official beginning in 2012, Viva Los Cupcakes has been baking Mexican inspired cupcakes to the delight of Los Angeles and neighboring cities. With award winning flavors like “Tamal con Mole”, “Conchita”, “Churro con Cajeta”, “Horchata”, and the wild “Street Elote”, “Mangoneada”, and “Chile En Nogada” to name a few, Viva Los Cupcakes has made a name for itself presenting a classic American dessert with a modern Mexican twist. After 4 years of cupcake catering and being on the road, Viva Los Cupcakes is in preparations to take the next step of moving into its own flagship bakery.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture

"There are so many things tied to food - emotions and memories - it’s a powerful thing." - Karina Jimenez

In this episode, we chat with VivaLosCupcakes Founder, Karina Jimenez about her move from Mexico. In this interview, Karina talks about how she brought her Mexican upbringing into her cupcake business today.

“I grew up in Mexico so that’s where all my inspiration comes from. I remember going to the mercadas, all the candies, and the desserts. I grew up with all of that.”

Karina also discusses how she was a feminist before she even knew about the label and how being one is still prevalent when it comes to her business.

“I learned the word later but, I just knew it in me. I always realized when things were unfair and when I was treated differently because I was a woman.”

Audrey and Yvette talk about the importance of food in their households growing up, the different traditions they were raised around, and the importance of gender roles.

"I’ve come to the point in my life where I strive to think of people as people. Not as genders." - Karina Jimenez

This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 11, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 12

Following Your Dreams As a Mother with Jessica Resendiz

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Jessica Resendiz was born in Queretaro, Mexico and immigrated to United States when she was only 8 months old. In 2011 she graduated from FIDM with a degree in Fashion Product Development. In late 2011 Raggedy Tiff was born, it started as Headpieces and jewelry but throughout the years Raggedy Tiff has been growing and expanding specializing in Apparel ,Accessories, Home Decor, Stationary. All of which is dedicated to Jessica's Mexicana roots, culture and child hood memories.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture

"I feel like every woman is able to do something inspiring." - Jessica Resendiz

In this episode, we chat with Raggedy Tiff Founder,  Jessica Resendiz about discrimination. In this interview, Jessica talks about how she didn’t have to deal with discrimination until recently. She mentions what it’s like for her to raise a daughter now, in Trump Nation.

“I tell my daughter to continue to do what you’re doing in school, keep rising, and make a difference. I have a huge thing for women making a difference.”  

Jessica also talks about how her daughter and fiancee encouraged her to make the jump from her 9 to 5 to her passion project.

“I took the lead, I guess I was brave with the encouragement of my fiancee and daughter! I feel like they believed in me more than I did. They said “I think it’s time.” and ya know, it doesn’t hurt to try?”

Audrey and Yvette talk about their undying love for Selena and how they stumbled into creating the Brown Girls Rising podcast.

“Standing out culturally is something you should be proud of!” - Yvette Montoya

This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 11, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 11

When It Comes to Activism, Age Ain't Nothing but a Number with Marina Preciado

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Marina Preciado is 17 years old. She uses social media to inform, educate, and empower people — especially youth — about current events and social issues. As a proud Chicana and lover of humanity, she hopes to pursue a career in the education or judicial system in order to educate others and promote diversity.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture

“I’ve realized that being brown doesn’t make me stand out in a bad way, if anything it makes me stand out in a good way!” - Marina Preciado

In this episode, we chat with MTV contributor,  Marina Preciado about being socially aware at a young age. In this interview, Marina talks about coming into her own and accepting the “brown girl” that she is.

“I used to tell my friends that I didn’t want to go out in the sun because, I didn’t want to be darker. I didn’t want to tan! I would even tell my friends that I didn’t speak spanish even though, I fluently speak spanish!”

Marina also talks about her current experience as a brown girl at primarily white high school. She replays how her and her friends organized a school walk out in light of the election.

“It was really ironic, because we had just learned about our right to protest! Then we did a protest at school - all morning we were researching our rights and making little booklets! I don’t want to say it was fun but, it was very interesting.”

Audrey and Yvette compare and relive their 2000 high school experience to Marina’s current situation.

To keep up with Marina, head to: Twitter, MTV, Latinx4Change.

This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 11, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 10

Falling Into Feminism with photographer + videographer, Erin Rivera

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Erin Rivera started her career in digital marketing, and from there she created the yellow brick road of her creative journey. As co-founder of visual story-telling agency Hunter & Fox, she has been able to work with such brands as: Nasty Gal, Stoli Vodka, and Darling Magazine. Her daily life revolves around producing creative content, video editing, illustrating, and spoiling her English Bulldog Ozzy. As Hunter & Fox grows, Erin is looking forward to working with more brands and creatives to keep telling innovative stories with her partner/boyfriend Frankie Pimentel.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"I’m going to speak up through my art and tell people that I am a feminist." - Erin Rivera

In this episode, we sat down with photographer + videographer, Erin Rivera, to talk about creating the Unidos image and her first art show Miss Representation. Erin also talks about the feeling of doubt and finding her worth during these times.

I’ll second guess and I don’t think people will understand it or I think, “Maybe it’s not good enough..” I have problems when it comes to setting a price on my work because, I do this out of passion and love and I don’t know how much its worth.”

Erin went on to speak up about how her parents inadvertently led her to be the strong feminist she is today and how she came to that realization.

I think I was doing feminist things without even realizing it. Little things that my parents let me do, and they let me just go with my ideas. They helped mold me. Now that I’m older, I’m starting to notice more inequalities between men and women.

Audrey and Yvette talk about the importance of the Unidos print to them and Yvette discusses what it was like to be part of Erin’s artwork in her Miss Representation piece.

"Little things that my parents let me do and how they let me just go with my ideas - they helped mold me. " - Erin Rivera

This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 04, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 09

Beating the Boys and Breaking Down Barriers with Producer + Drummer, CinDee

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Cindy Bojorquez, otherwise known as CinDee, is a queer Guatemalan-American hardcore punk drummer, digital media artist, and music producer from Los Angeles. She explores subjects of social inequality, feminism, and current events as her creative muse. Currently, her focus is to produce, distribute and archive underground music by people of color via her independent record label "Resisting with Music," while documenting her own struggles as a queer Latina in the media technology industry.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"Women who take direct action to address the injustices that we face are the women that inspire me." - CinDee

In this episode, we sat down with music producer + drummer, CinDee to talk about her Latina experience. CinDee went on talk about how finding her worth and coming out to her family led her to where she is today.

“I didn’t expect my family to tell me they loved me regardless of my sexual preference. I got very lucky in a sense of having a family that accepted me.”

CinDee goes on to talk about how she had to fight her way into the music world, because it’s a very male dominated space. She also talks about how she has changed since breaking the mold.

“I have experienced that patriarchism and elitism of being a “male experience”. It just makes me think, “I can do this myself” I don’t need them.”

Yvette and Audrey talk about their own Latina experience and Audrey gets a quick lesson on rock music she missed out on.

“What do you need and who do you need to talk to in order to get what you want?” - Audrey Bellis

This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 04, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 08

All Things Body Image with Founder + Director, Gloria Lucas 

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Gloria is the founder and director of Nalgona Positivity Pride a xicana-indigenous body-positive project that focuses on eating disorders awareness and cultural affirmation. She is a frequent lecturer across the country covering topics such as the connection of historical trauma and disordered eating. Some of the locations Gloria has lectured at are the University of California, Los Angeles, University of Michigan School of Social Work, and the Binge Eating Disorder Association (BEDA) Conference. Gloria’s work has been featured at the Huffington Post, Univision, Bitch Magazine, and The Body is not an Apology. She lives in Los Angeles, CA where she lives with her 2 cats and boyfriend.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"We should be able to celebrate ourselves and honor our bodies" - Gloria Lucas

In this episode we chat with Nalgona Positivity Pride Founder, Gloria Lucas, to talk about body positivity. Gloria talks about creating awareness and how all body shapes and sizes are beautiful.

"Mass production of what beauty is and how we “should” look, isn’t really how our bodies are meant to look. We should celebrate ourselves and honor our bodies."

Gloria goes on to talk about how everyone is in a different stage of body acceptance and how their can be a double standard between our bodies and food.

"We need to encourage one another as women. Everyone is on their own journey and you may not realize it. We’re all learning and in opportunities of hate, I get to learn the most."

Audrey and Yvette talk about the body shame they felt growing up, their relationship with food, and how they stay body positive now.

"Body positivity is creating a community where people can fall in love with themselves." - Gloria Lucas

This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 04, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 07

Home, Health, and Healing with Todo Verde Founder, Jocelyn Ramirez

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Todo Verde founder, Jocelyn Ramirez, is a vegan cook, yoga instructor, and advocate for healthy food access in her community. In this process, she noticed the disproportion of healthy food options in the LA area after years of driving across town in search of healthier food for her and her family.

She founded Todo Verde in 2015 with a mission to create delicious and healthy plant-based food options inspired by familiar flavors using Mexican and South American ingredients. Todo Verde's menu includes local, fresh, and organically grown ingredients from local small businesses, farmers, and a mission based food purchasing cooperative.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"It’s really powerful to be able to feed myself and my family that going to make us healthy." - Jocelyn Ramirez

In this episode we chat with Todo Verde Founder, Jocelyn Ramirez about how learning about food and creating her own changed her life. Jocelyn talks about how you can secure self regulation and how food can bring healing.

“It’s really powerful to be able to feed myself and my family and make us healthy. We see folks who gather around food. Looking at that, it feels great to share that within your community.”

Jocelyn goes on to discuss how food and vegan food, specifically, doesn’t have to be a class thing. She then gives her easy How-Tos on how to migrate toward a vegan lifestyle:

“I would say minimize meat and dairy. Just try a plant based diet for a few days a week. Then you’ll start to decolonize your diet.”

Audrey and Yvette talk about how they’re upbringing around food, their inner foodie, and seek answers to their many vegan questions.

"If you're not planning to succeed, then you're planning to fail!" - Audrey Bellis

Other fun things Jocelyn mentioned: Omnivore's Dilemma, Cocina House, and Eastside Cafe

This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 04, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 06

Making America Brown Again with restaurateur, Bricia Lopez 

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Having been born and raised in Mitla, Oaxaca, rich in culinary tradition and indigenous food culture, Bricia comes from a long lineage of Oaxacan Mezcal craftsman. She grew up in her grandmothers kitchen where alongside her mother and sisters, lived the traditions of mole and true artisanal cooking. Her father founded Guelaguetza in 1994, a Oaxacan restaurant that has become a temple to Oaxacan food and tradition in Los Angeles and the US. She began working alongside her family in the restaurant business at a very young age. Bricia is a graduate of Mount Saint Mary’s College, majoring in Business Administration. She is currently a partner at Guelaguetza and today, spearheads all operations alongside her three siblings.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"You need to allow people to be on their own and be their own person." - Bricia Lopez

In this episode we chat with restaurateur, Bricia Lopez, about keeping traditions strong through molee. Bricia also talks about the exchange between masculine and feminine energy and how she’s introducing that to her son.

"Being  a strong woman doesn’t mean that we need to be filled with this masculine energy. You need to allow people to be on their own and be their own person."

Bricia goes on talk about her visit to the white house, meeting President Obama, and her plans on Making America Brown Again.

"You can’t buy authenticity. You can’t buy culture. You just can’t recreate it. We need to learn how to be proactive instead of being reactive. Like, what can we do to change the situation of things today?"

Audrey and Yvette talk about their differences in growing up as a Brown Girl in different parts of California, family drama, and how they keep family traditions strong.

"Relationships are the place where you either find yourself or you lose yourself" - Audrey Bellis

This episode, Brown Girls Rising Episode 04, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 05

"Otherness", Oppression, and Overcoming with Digital Video Producer, Yessica Cruz 

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Seattle born digital video creator now living in the very hot city of Los Angeles. She worked up the ranks of BuzzFeed Motion Pictures, producing over 22 digital videos & appearing in more than 137 videos, was a founding producer and personality behind Buzzfeed’s Latinx Facebook page, Pero Like. Yessica hosted and produced an 11 episode series on Flama called Mas Mexican focusing on understanding different aspects of Mexican identity by meeting people in the street. Yessica currently produces shows with People Be Like, focusing on entertaining yet informative content aimed at a diverse millennial audience. 

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

 

“I’m going to use my voice to advocate for people” - Yessica Cruz

In this episode, we sit down with Digital Video Producer, Yessica Cruz, to chat about how she strives to celebrate difference in latin culture. In this interview, Yessica talks about moving from Seattle, latinx, and societal inequality.

“Coming from an intersectional, multi-culture background in Seattle, I identify with the others. I know, that it is a terrible thing to grow up with, feeling like you can’t trust your government. That’s also very dangerous, to have citizens afraid of the government. That’s no way to have a democracy.”

Yessica goes on to talk about how the feeling of oppression has weighed on her since she was three years old and that  lead her to speak out to her audience that is a younger generation.

“I’m going to use my voice to advocate for people. I want to evoke change and I think younger kids and people are my age are the ones to evoke change.

Yvette and Audrey talk about their fears as America transitions with the new president and their feeling of “otherness” which have resurfaced.

"By unlearning a lot of things that society taught me, I became woke" - Yessica Cruz

This and previous episodes of Brown Girls Rising, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & SoundCloud.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 04

Knowing Your Roots and Keeping Sane with, Writer + Producer Betsy Aimee Cardenas 

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Betsy Aimee Cardenas is a writer and producer of impactful digital content on a mission to transform hearts and minds. She is the co-host of Women Who Misbehave, a podcast about the intersections of the political, personal, pop-culture, and spiritual. She writes about issues that affect millennials, her work has been featured in Marie Claire, Forbes Woman, Vox, and others. 

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

 

"We’re going to see we’re the ones we’ve been waiting for" - Betsy Aimee Cardenas

In this episode, we chat with Writer and Producer, Betsy Aimee Cardenas knowing your roots. In this interview, Betsy talks about being a first generation child and what it’s like to raise her son as a feminist.  

“I believe in equality among the sexes. It’s about having choice filled lives. We teach our daughter that they can be strong, but we teach our sons they have to be strong. We can’t want equality and then have fantasies of men rescuing us.”

Betsy goes on to talk about how she’s never shied away from the F word and who her biggest inspirations are.

“Gloria Stienem is one of my role models. One of the things I realized growing up is that a lot of my feminism focused on white-middle class. There are so many other heroes, Sonia Sotormeyor. I love her, she’s an amazing role model. She’s what an outspoken Latina looks like. Cherri Moraga is an amazing chicana writer.... ”

Audrey and Yvette compare stories of their first experience with “otherness” and growing up feeling like “too much or not enough” in both worlds.

"Your mental sanity is worth making changes in your life” - Betsy Aimee Cardenas

This and previous episodes of Brown Girls Rising, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & SoundCloud

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 03

Speaking on Spanglish and Stepping Into Your Power with Radio + TV Personality RaqC

 

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Raquel Cordova, better known as RaqC, coined “The Queen of Spanglish Media” and uses her blogging platform on Latina Magazine’s celebrity blog to share tips on what it means to be a “modern day Latina”. RaqC credits her free spirit as the inspiration to seize every opportunity that presents itself. She views radio as an outlet to express her love, happiness, and ambitions with the masses.

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Español to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

“Don’t ever be afraid of anyone telling you, ‘You’re thinking too big!’” - RaqC

In this episode, we sit down with Radio and TV personality, RaqC,  to talk about how she stumbled into her own and made a career of it. This interview is filled with stories of how stepping out of her comfort zone, SnapChat, and just being herself led RaqC to where she is today.

“When people don’t take you serious, your mentality starts to change. You start asking, “Is this ever going to change?” At the end of the day, I realize that I bring value to whatever I do. You have to train your mind that and I practice what I preach. I had to tell myself I am worthy”

RaqC also opens about how she didn’t realize she was a feminist right away and how she had to make it her own.

“Throughout my career 90% of my bosses have been men, and the women were secretaries or assistant VPs and I’m like why? I just want women to step in their greatness and own their independence.”

Audrey and Yvette gab about their individual views of feminism including how they found themselves and their true callings right around turning 30.

“You’re always going to be too much or not enough for somebody” - Audrey Bellis

This and previous episodes of Brown Girls Rising, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & Soundcloud.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

 

Episode No. 02

Talking About Art and Activism with Illustrator + Art Curator, Maritza Lugo

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Martiza is currently a freelance illustrator and art curator. She recently launched her first art show, Women of Color Only. Often referred to as the Pop Culture Queen she can be found transforming Disney Princesses to be "Just Like Us" through illustration. Featured: Buzzfeed, Latina, Refinery29, teenVogue, Glamour, PopSugar, Forbes, and many more. 

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture.

"The passion for your career should be louder than the doubt" - Martiza Lugo

In this episode, we sit down with Illustrator and Art Curator, Maritza Lugo, to discuss her call to feminist action. In this interview, Maritza candidly opens up about hosting her first art show, which featured Women of Color Only and was the first of it’s kind in Los Angeles.

“In all of the art shows I had been as an illustrator, I’ve never fully seen women of color. It’s always primarily white male and sometimes, female. So I thought how is this the first one in Los Angeles?”

Maritza also talks about how she was a right-of-the-womb feminist, but how her feminism has changed and evolved throughout the years.

“You could say my feminism has changed, now I only want to speak about feminism when it  includes women of color. I've always been a "brown girl" not just my makeup genetically but in my personality"

Yvette and Audrey talk about dodging the online haters, their mothers’ view of feminism versus their own, and why they think feminism sits on a spectrum.

"Women have been fighting for rights since the ‘20s but, if you don’t include marginalized voices then we’re all losing." - Martiza Lugo


This and previous episodes of Brown Girls Rising, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & Soundcloud.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.

Episode No. 01

What It Means To Be A "Brown Girl" with NYLON en Español Editor In Chief, Marty Preciado

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Marty is currently serving as Editor In Cheif for NYLON Español Media. Research and writing focuses on transcultural exchange of politics and gender, with an emphasis on music, arts and culture. Additionally, has lead editorial teams and launched team projects in Madrid, Washington D.C, Mexico City and currently in Los Angeles. Published: VICE, NYLON Español, Remezcla, Rookie, Noisey. Featured: NPR, NBC, Univisión. 

Brown Girls Rising is a partnership with Nylon Espanol to elevate the conversation of feminist action, leadership, community involvement, and culture. In our inaugural episode, we sit down with Editor In Chief of Nylon En Espanol, Marty Preciado to explore her feminist experiences.

"We’re in a society where we’re constantly looking up to role models without thinking you can also be one." - Marty Preciado

In this interview she recalls racial injustices during the ICE Raids in the 90s. We also chat about how blue hair and The Spice girls ignited the feminist within her:

"I grew up listening to punk music and first arose to girl power, thanks to the Spice Girls, without knowing that the Spice Girls was a movement created by a white group here in the United States. So while I was listening to punk music and had blue hair, I felt rebellious until I understood that where I was hanging out was void of women. No women, period."

Marty also talks about how intersectional feminism and her personal role models lead her to work at Nylon Espanol today:

"I went to school for law and political science, that was my goal., until I realized that I was could  make a change through culture and not just through the law. I wanted to make a change through the everyday incidents, through life, through music, through literature, through entertainment and try to find the representation of people of our community into the spaces that are needed."

Audrey and Yvette candidly chat about coming into their own forms of feminism,  the stigma attached with that particular F-word, how they’re always adjusting and relearning the definition of it.  

“If one person isn't free, none of us are free." - Yvette Montoya

This episode, can be found at BrownGirlsRising.com or on iTunes & Soundcloud.

This episode was recorded in sunny Downtown Los Angeles at Maker City LA.